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Technolagy

 
 

 
 

 
 

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speakers

Rodrick T. Miller

Rodrick T. Miller

President & CEO
New Orleans Business Alliance

John Schneider

John Schneider

Chairman
Springboard Baton Rouge

David Doss

David Doss

State Director
U.S. Senator David Vitter Office

Dr. Yu Jiang

Dr. Yu Jiang

Director
Confucius Institute, Xavier University

Dr. Challa S.S.R. Kumar

Dr. Challa Kumar

Director of Nanofabrication & Nanomaterials
CAMD, LSU

Gordon W. Bergstue

Gordon W. Bergstue

Production Director
Boeing SLS Michoud Operations

Ben Johnson

Ben Johnson

President
New Orleans Chamber of Commerce

Les Guice

Dr. Les Guice

President
Louisiana Tech University

Wes Withrow

Wes Withrow

President
R2 CyberSecurity

Roderic Teamer

Roderic Teamer

Director of Diversity Programs and Business Development
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Louisiana

Ron Markham

Ron Markham

Executive Director
LEDA Educational Foundation

Geoffrey Parker

Geoffrey Parker

Professor of Management Science
Tulane University

Dr. Jose Bautista

Dr. Jose Bautista

Professor of Economicx
Xavier University (Ohio)

Eric Smith

Eric Smith

Associate Director
Tulane Energy Institute

Kelly Pepper

Kelly Pepper

President & CEO
Louisiana Assocation of Non Profit Organizations (LANO)

Jill Mazur

Jill Mazur

Vice President National Clients
Kuhler Tax Credits

Shelly Compton

Shelly Compton

Vice President, Engineering & Technical Services
Textron Systems Marine & Land Systems

Tammy Randles

Tammy Randles/h3>

President/Broker
Realty Executives SELA

Register

  • Panels Only: $100
  • Panels and Dinner: $150
  • University Students: Free (must show student id)

Panel I

U. S. Economy Series:

“Inequality in the U.S.”

Panel Discussion: 10:00am – 11:00am
Q & A: 11:00am – 11:15am
Room: 305

This session, “INEQUALITY IN THE UNITED STATES”, will feature leading practitioners and political leaders contributing to the development of science and technology in our region. Panelists will address the serious crisis our nation faces due to the widening economic gap driven by labor markets’ rising inequality in wages and earnings. Income from capital further drives the inequality distribution in the United States, with redistribution playing only a minor, yet more or less constant role. There is a large body of research on the causes of rising inequality and the consensus view is that technological change has increased the demand for skilled workers faster than the supply of skilled workers in the United States. Additionally, we will explore the impact on the local economy as well as our potential manufacturing capabilities, capitalization of intellectual assets, and how to remain competitive in the global marketplace.

Dr. Yu Jiang

Dr. Yu
Jiang

The Chinese Confucian Institute at Xavier

Rod Miller

Rod
Miller

President & CEO
New Orleans Business Alliance

Ben Johnson

Ben
Johnson

President
New Orleans Chamber of Commerce

Kelly Pepper

Kelly
Pepper

President & CEO
Louisiana Assocation of Non Profit Organizations (LANO)

John Schneider

John
Schneider

Chairman
Springboard Baton Rouge

Panel II

Global Competitiveness Series:

“The future outlook of U.S. manufacturing capabilities to drive economic growth and the challenges we face in the global Knowledge- based economy.”

Panel Discussion: 11:30am – 12:15pm
Q & A: 12:15pm – 12:30pm
Room: 305

Over the past several decades, the globalization of the manufacturing ecosystem has driven more change and impacted the prosperity of more companies, nations and people than at any time since the dawn of the Industrial Revolution. Nations around the world have taken part in and benefited from the rapid globalization of industry and the expansion of manufacturing. Globalization of manufacturing has been a key driver of higher-value job creation and a rising standard of living for the growing middle class in emerging nation economies. This has dramatically changed the nature of competition not only between companies, but between emerging and developed nations as well. Many emerging economies used by multinationals as locations of low-cost labor have developed significant manufacturing and innovation capabilities permitting them to produce increasingly advanced manufactured products.

Explore U.S. - China trade relationship, and the future of the U.S. manufacturing base in this session.

Dr. Les Guice

Dr. Les
Guice

President of Louisiana Tech

Dr. Challa Kumar

Dr. Challa
Kumar

Director of Nanofabrication & Nanomaterials at LSU

Dr. Jose Bautista

Dr. Jose
Bautista

Professor of Economicx
Xavier University (Ohio)

Jill Mazur

Jill
Mazur

Vice President National Clients
Kuhler Tax Credits

Shelly Compton

Shelly Compton

Vice President, Engineering & Technical Services
Textron Systems Marine & Land Systems

STEM  Workshop

Aero Space Seminar by Boeing

STEM Workshop seminar for area high school juniors and seniors

STEM Workshop: 1:00PM – 2:00pm
Soft press release: 2:00pm – 2:15pm
Room: 205

Description Coming Soon

Panel III

Modern Technology and Economy Series:

“Technological progress and economic growth”

Panel Discussion: 2:00pm – 3:00pm
Q & A: 3:00pm – 3:15pm
Room: 305

With the emergence of accelerated technological change and progress, economic growth has been exhibiting increasingly complex features. Trade within and across industries, countries and regions, has risen sharply, and the globalization effects of economies of specialization, digital information technologies and networks have taken a stronger grip on economies. Furthermore, long-run economic growth backed by conventional fossil-based technologies (within the context of an increasing population and escalating demands for goods and services) are exerting an unprecedented pressure on the environment, particularly in terms of greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. It is nearly impossible to overstate the role of technology in economic life. Imagine how one’s life would be different without such everyday technological innovations as computers, smartphones, wireless communications, Internet, automobiles and airplanes, electricity and petrochemicals.

Explore the social and economic impact since the industrial revolution, and how this technological progress has shaped the global economies.

Wes Withrow

Wes Withrow

R2 CyberSecurity

Rod Teamer

Roderic Teamer

Director of Diversity Programs and
Business Development
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Louisiana

Rod Teamer

Geoffrey Parker

Professor of Management Science
Tulane University

Tammy Randles

Tammy Randles/h3>

President/Broker
Realty Executives SELA

Panel IV

The Global Energy Landscape and Economic Growth Series:

"The Future of energy"

Panel Discussion: 3:30pm – 4:30pm
Q & A: 4:30pm - 4:45pm
Room: 305

From 2010 to 2040, the world’s population is projected to rise from 7 billion to nearly 9 billion, and the global economy will more than double. Over that same period, global energy demand is likely to rise by about 35 percent, but our world’s energy landscape is always more complex than it seems at first glance. In the coming decades, the energy sector will face an increasingly complex array of interlocking challenges – economic, geopolitical, technological, environmental and not just in the OECD countries.

A further constraint on the use of conventional energy resources, including coal, will almost certainly come into play as increasingly tight limits are placed on the total amount of greenhouse gases that can be released into the atmosphere – and that constraint will in turn lead to greater interest in alternative energy sources and technologies. The responses to this varied range of developments will play a crucial role in shaping trade and investment flows, competitive positions, and the structure of economies across the globe, while simultaneously determining mankind’s capacity to construct a sustainable future.

Coming Soon

Eric Smith

Associate Director
Tulane Energy Institute

Coming Soon

Coming Soon

Panel V

The Leadership Innovation Seminar

Panel Discussion: 5:00pm – 5:45pm
Q & A: 5:45pm – 6:00pm
Room: 305

More than ever before, business innovation is a strategic imperative. A critical driver of growth, competitiveness, and shareholder value, innovation is cited by senior executives around the globe as integral to their companies’ success. Innovation benefits countries as well. In those with thriving industries, people have higher incomes, a better quality of life, and a higher standard of living than in less robust nations.

This powerful leadership development program offered by LEDA Group builds upon each leader’s strengths, and creates greater competence in areas needing improvement. This high impact program is customized to meet the specific growth and development needs of executives and managers. Leaders will emerge from this program with dramatically improved leadership skills and effectiveness. The program is highly interactive, and all materials and activities are designed to produce graduates who will impact their organizations now, and for years to come.

Ron Markham

Ron Markham

Executive Director
LEDA Educational Foundation

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location

Xavier University  •  University Center, Building 17
1 Drexel Dr, New Orleans  •  Click here a campus map

Venue
Conference Dinner
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Schedule

Doors open at 9:00 a.m. Breakfast will be served from 9:00 to 10:00 a.m. when the Panels will begin.
Event will end with a keynote dinner at the Bourbon Orleans Hotel at 7:00 p.m.

10:00am - 11:00am

Panel I

U. S. Economy Series

Speaker Name

11:15am - 11:30am

Short Break

 

Speaker Name

11:30am - 12:30pm

Panel II

Global Competitiveness Series

Speaker Name

1:00pm - 2:00pm

Lunch Break

 

Speaker Name

1:00pm - 2:00pm

STEM Workshop

Aero Space Seminar by Boeing

Speaker Name

2:00pm - 3:00pm

Panel III

Modern Technology and Economy Series

Speaker Name

3:20pm - 3:30pm

Short Break

 

Speaker Name

3:30pm - 4:30pm

Panel IV

The Global Energy Landscape and Economic Growth Series

Speaker Name

5:00pm - 5:45pm

Panel V

The Leadership Innovation Seminar

Speaker Name

6:00pm - 7:00pm

Cocktail Hour

 

Speaker Name

7:00 pm

Networking Dinner

Keynote / Closing Remarks

Speaker Name

Where should I stay?

New Orleans Hotel Collection

What to do in New Orleans?

New Orleans Convention & Vistors Bureau

Frequently Asked Questions

When do tickets go on sale?

Tickets are on sale NOW! Please click on REGISTER button at the
top of this page.


Is there an age restriction for the TechFest?

Yes, unless accompanied by a legal guardian or teacher, attendees must be 14 and up.
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Sponsors

Textron
MCC Group
Kuhler Tax Credits

Partners

Thanks to our awesome partners who help make Technolagy 2014 possible.

Interested in being a sponsor in 2014?

Download the Brochure  /  Become a Sponsor

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About Us

Connecting The Supply and Demand Sides of Innovation

As the most innovative science and technology event in New Orleans, Technolagy is a communication and business platform, it has served as the proving ground for innovators and breakthrough technologies in recent years. The global stage where next-generation innovations are introduced to the marketplace.

The New Orleans Science & Technology Show, “Technolagy” is owned and produced by LEDA Educational Foundation, a 501(c)(3) organization, with the purpose of promoting growth in the Louisiana's science and technology industry, as well as workforce placement. The goal of the event is to create a collaborative environment where various groups of professionals, such as scientists, engineers, IT professionals, academic institutions, entrepreneurs, and investors, can learn and share latest works, innovative ideas, and business opportunities. This experiental effort is crucial to make innovation, entrepreneurship, and economic growth a more integral part of our economy.

The event includes corporate members involved in innovation and entrepreneurship as well as the design, development, manufacturing, distribution, and integration of consumer electronics products.

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